Wharton State Forest

  • Living in southern New Jersey for the first 21 years of my life gave me plenty of time to learn and appreciate the surrounding areas. When I entered my mid-teens, I became slightly obsessed with the local state forest and all it had to offer; it is still my favorite area of southern NJ. Wharton State Forest, the largest single tract of land within the New Jersey State Park System, has more than 110,000 acres which incorporate Atlantic, Burlington and Camden Counties. It is located in the heart of the pine barrens, about 20 miles northwest of Atlantic City and approximately 40 miles southeast of Philadelphia. It's history is a rich one including it's use by the Lenni-Lenape Indians and it's successful iron industry during the Revolutionary War and War of 1812. In 1876, a Philadelphia industrialist by the name of Joseph Wharton purchased Batsto Village and acquired much of the land. When Wharton died in 1909, he owned approximately 96,000 acres of the forest. The State of New Jersey purchased the land in 1954 for recreational use. You can find numerous camp sites, nature centers, picnic spots, areas for hunting and fishing, and horseback riding trails. However, I found my enjoyment by exploring Wharton's endless dirt roads, trails and historic, sometimes abandoned, buildings. The following pages show pictures from three main areas of the Wharton State Forest: Atsion Village, Batsto Village and Carranza Road. These are all incredibly beautiful areas rich in history. If you would like more information on Wharton State Forest, please don't hesitate to contact me! If my pictures spark an interest, make sure to check out Weird New Jersey and The Midnight Society. Enjoy!

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    Atsion Village

    See Atsion Village

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    Batsto Village

    Visit Batsto Village

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    Carranza Road

    Drive Carranza Road


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